3-11-2008

stve

CREATING SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL

 

Walking and biking to school should be safer for Illinois school students, in grades k-8, thanks to 112 state projects approved for funding through a federal program.  "Safe Routes to School” is providing $8.3 million to Illinois communities, over three years, so they can make it safer for students to walk and ride to school.  In our area, the communities of Highland and Marine will receive funds for this program.  Highland will receive $7,000.00 to utilize portable speed feedback trailers or signs and Marine will receive $500.00 for a parent/guardian safety evaluation and $3,150.00 to create a crossing guard training program.


AMERICAN RED CROSS BLOOD DRIVE RESULTS

 

The VFW Post 1377 and the Pocahontas School each hosted an American Red Cross Blood Drive March 6th.  A total of 56 units were donated.  Ali Potthast received a blood drop pin.  Carole Bohle was presented a 10-gallon pin, Valerie Gaffner a 9-gallon pin, Wesley Gasser a 7-gallon pin, Jo Ann Reymond a 6-gallon pin, Jane Hilliard a 5-gallon pin and Jim Weiss a 4-gallon pin.


ILLINOIS ' CAPITOL FORUM HELD FOR STUDENTS

 

Nearly 140 high school students from across Illinois were recently welcomed in Springfield to participate in the Illinois Capitol Forum on America's Future.  The event is a civic education program that challenges young people to learn about and discuss important issues that will affect future generations.

 

Secretary of State Jesse White explains the nationally known program allows students the opportunity to get together and talk with peers about the government and foreign policy.  The Capitol Forum Program is coordinated nationally by the Choices for the 21st Century Education Program.


THE SIGNS AND HOW TO PREVENT CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING

 

It's a tasteless, odorless gas that can make people very sick or even die…it's called carbon monoxide.  This is the time of year when the cold weather outside calls for extra heating inside, resulting in an increased chance of carbon monoxide poisoning.  State laws say that all homes with gas appliances or electricity must have a carbon monoxide detector, as this pre-warning system has been proven to save lives.

 

The elderly, young children and those with pre-existing cardiac conditions are most susceptible to CO poisoning.  Symptoms may first appear to be the flu, but then progress to burning eyes, fatigue, shortness of breath, dizziness and unconsciousness. Visible signs, that carbon monoxide is present, include black soot on or around air registers, flues, burners or access opening to appliances, moisture condensation inside windows and dead or dying houseplants.  If anyone in your house is feeling ill and you suspect a Co problem, get the victim into fresh air and call the Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222 or call 911.




SPORTS FOR TUESDAY

 

HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER

 

The Lady Comets soccer team will start their season today at home against East Alton Wood River.  


OBITUARIES

None to Report

Do you subscribe to the WGEL Daily? If not sign up now for free daily News!

- WGEL Daily Sign Up -
Email
First Name
Last Name

Wgel.com | Community Calendar | Daily Archive